Historical Musicology: New Articles

From time to time this page will feature articles on newly identified findings relating to the musical scene in London during the latter half of the eighteenth century and the early years of the nineteenth century.

I would like these findings to be readily accessible to both academic colleagues and others with an interest in the field alike. For this reason I have decided to make the articles available for download as PDF files (subject to my copyright) via my website.

I hope readers will find the material reported informative and useful — and of course enjoyable! And I will be happy to receive feedback. All articles on this site are copyright © Margaret Debenham, 2011 - 2018.

Article 1: Margaret Debenham (2011). 131 Cheapside: The Longman Connection

The story recounted in this article is a sequel to that described in my co-authored paper with Professor George Bozarth, ‘Piano Wars: the Legal Machinations of London Pianoforte Makers, 1795–1806’ (2009).  The evidence present provides new insights into the history of James Longman in his final years, in particular focusing on his relationship with John Longman of 131, Cheapside. I draw upon original court case documents, contemporary newspaper and magazine notices, directory entries and wills. An abstract of this paper is available.

The full article is available for download in PDF format via the link below:

Article 1: 131 Cheapside: The Longman Connection

Citation: Debenham, M. (2011). 131 Cheapside: The Longman Connection. Margaret Debenham: website publication (www.debenham.me.uk).

Article 2: Margaret Debenham (2012). 131 Cheapside: The Longman Connection: Postscript

This short paper presents a summary of information to supplement that discussed in Debenham (2011) 131 Cheapside: The Longman Connection. The sources reported include:

These newly identified records highlight connections between James Longman, his kinsman John Longman [of 131, Cheapside], Richard Hovill and Dr Joseph Barton of Berners Street.

The full article is available in PDF format via the link below:

131 Cheapside - The Longman Connection: Postscript, 03 May 2012.

Citation: Debenham, M. (2012). 131 Cheapside: The Longman Connection: Postscript. Margaret Debenham: website publication (www.debenham.me.uk).

Article 3: List of wills of pianoforte and musical instrument makers (not exclusive), identified by the author from the Index of Wills registered in The Prerogative Court of Canterbury:  1384 –12 January 1858 (series PROB 11) held at The National Archives, UK.

[Note: For an informative report of her extensive exploration of information drawn from musical instrument maker wills see:

Marie Kent Exposing the London Piano Industry Workforce, c1765-1914'. PhD thesis, London Metropolitan University, 2013]

Article 4: Directory entries for London Musical Instrument Makers in the years 1763, 1793 and 1794, identified by the author from Mortimer’s Universal Director, 1763; Wakefield’s Directory, 1793, and Kent’s Directory, 1794.

Article 5: List of wills of organ builders identified by the author from the Index of Wills registered in The Prerogative Court of Canterbury:  1384 –12 January 1858 (series PROB 11), held at The National Archives, UK.

Article 6: List of wills for music sellers identified by the author from The National Archives, UK Index of wills registered in The Prerogative Court of Canterbury:  1384 –12 January 1858 (series PROB 11).

Update: New article added, 27 August 2018

Article 7: Margaret Debenham (2018) Thomas Chippendale(1718-1779): musical instrument connections and new insights

Abstract

Revered as the greatest furniture maker of his age, the name of Thomas Chippendale does not however immediately spring to mind in connection with the manufacture of musical instruments. So, in this the 300th anniversary year of his birth, it was fascinating to discover a newspaper advertisement placed by Chippendale and Rannie in 1758 offering for sale a barrel organ housed within a ‘handsome Piece of Furniture’ at their shop in St Martin’s Lane.

Other newly identified primary source materials relating to Chippendale’s life and work include a report of a City of Westminster Coroner’s Inquest into a suspicious death, which provides positive identification of four workmen employed in his chair workshop in 1772; and two records relating to his second marriage in 1777 – a Marriage Allegation and Bond, both personally signed by Thomas Chippendale.

The full article is available in .pdf format via the link below:

Thomas Chippendale (1718-1779): musical instrument connections and new insights

[Author's note, 29 August 2018: Minor text correction in Chippendale article - with apology for proof reading error. Under the heading 'Franklin [Franklen] Thomas', p.10, in para.3 line 4, words 3 and 4 please replace 'Thomas Franklin' with 'Franklin Thomas'.]

Copyright © Margaret Debenham, 2011 -2018. Permission is granted to print or download one copy of each of the above articles, for the purposes of personal private research only. No further reproduction of any part of the material may be made without the express permission of the author.

Page last updated 29 August 2018.

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